European Master and Certification Program
in Risk Engineering and Management

VIII-R07 CoF
Accident and Consequences Modeling

Course code: 136477
Language of instruction: English
Lecturers: Prof. Dr. Petar Stanojevi─ç, Dr. rer. nat. Ronald Zinke (Otto-von-Guericke-Universit├Ąt Magdeburg), Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil Ulrich Krause (Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Process and Systems Engineering, Institute of Apparatus and Environmental Engineering)
Assessment: Defined in the module

Short description

The course deals with accident and consequences modeling in industry. Three main topics are covered by the course: modeling of explosion, fire modeling and industrial fires. The modeling is elaborated by explaining general techniques and illustrated by examples of applied methods: CDF model, Baker-Strehlow-Tang model, Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model, as well as Phenomenological and Stoichiometric models. Attendees will not only be able to differentiate between fire and explosion, but also know how to do simple calculations of consequence with an appropriate comprehension of explosion mechanism and fire principles.


Objectives

The course deals with accident and consequences modeling in industry. Three main lines are developed within the course: modeling of explosion, fire modeling and industrial fires. The modeling is elaborated by explaining general techniques for accident modeling illustrated by examples of applied methods.

In the end of the course a student will know:

  • the importance of accident and consequences modeling in industry
  • what is the difference between fire and explosion
  • explosion mechanisms and fire principles
  • general techniques for accident modeling
  • to do simple calculation of consequence

 


Target Attendees / Participants

  • Engineers (university level)
  • Managers
  • Inspectors
  • Legislators
  • Other professionals dealing with hazards and risk assessment
  • Students 

Course Content by Units

Unit 1: Introduction to accident and consequences modeling

Unit 2: Modeling of Gas Explosions

  • Explosion mechanisms
  • Modeling explosion venting: Simple models; Phenomenological models; CDF models; Probabilistic analysis
Unit 3: Modeling of blast generated by vapor cloud explosions
  • TNT
  • ME-method/Baker-Strehlow
  • CDF models
  • Probabilistic analysis
Unit 4: Modeling of Gas Dispersion
  • Emission: Two phase flow; Vessel blowdown; Vessel rupture; Vaporization 
  • Dispersion: Jets and plumes; Dense gas dispersion; CDF models
Unit 5: Industrial fires
  • General - Industrial fires vs. fires in housing
  • Two industrial fire examples
  • Building regulations – an example
  • Performance based design: Prescriptive codes vs. performance based design, Design fire scenarios
  • Determination of fire load
Unit 6: Industrial fires
  • Active fire protection: Heat and smoke ventilation, Automatic extinction systems, Oxygen reduction systems
  • Silo fires
Unit 7: Fire modeling
  • Introduction: Basic principles, Application of fire modeling,
  • The phenomenon of a fire, Hierarchy of fire models
  • Balance equations for mass, momentum and heat transfer (CFD models)
Unit 8: Fire modeling
  • Closure laws for CFD models:
  • Turbulence - The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes, model (RANS), The Large Eddy Simulation model (LES),
  • Chemical reaction models - General concepts, Stoichiometric models, Reaction rate model,
  • Mixture fraction,
  • Radiation models
Unit 10: Fire modeling - Models
  • Plume models
  • Zone models
  • CDF models
  • Smoke models
  • Egress models
Unit 11: Review of the main course issues

Teaching Methods

The course includes:

  • introductory note explaining aim and structure of the course, and used methodology as well
  • ex cathedra lecturing illustrated by number of examples
  • review of main topics in the end of each lecturing unit
  • presentation of commonly used software tools and collective exercises

Literature

  1. Textbook:
    Accident and Consequence Modeling, Version 2, May 2009
  2. Transparencies
    Explosion Effects and Consequences
    Gas Explosion, Basics
    Explosion Venting
    Dispersion
    Emission
    Examples of Gas Explosion Accidents
    Vapor Cloud Explosions
    Gas Explosion Mitigation
    Stability
    CoF Accident and Consequences Modeling – Gas Detonation
    Industrial fires
    Fire Modeling
    Flacks
  3. Certification material, Version 2, May 2009
  4. Additional material:
    McGrattan K, Fire Dynamics Simulator, user guide, NIST, 2006
    Feryiger JH, Peric M, Computational Methods for Fluid Dynamics third edition, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelnberg New York, 2002
    Knaus C, Modellierung von Brandszenarien in Gebaeuden (Modeling of fire scenarios in buildings), PhD thesis, Technical, University of Vienna, Austria, 2009 (Germany)
    Magnussen B.F., Hjertager B.H: On Mathematical Modeling of Turbulent Combustion with Special Emphasis on Soot Formation and Combustion. Comb. Inst., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, pp. 719-729, 1976
 


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For more information about the European Master Program in Risk Engineering and Management in general, go the Master Study page.
To see more courses in the curriculum, go to The curriculum page, or by date and topic go to the Calendar of Courses page.
Contact: via email sti889@risk-technologies.com or phone +49 711 1839 781 or +49 711 1839 647
(Course profile ID: VIII-R07, generated on November 19, 2018)